Tips If coffee gives you anxiety but tea doesn't, try taking an L-Theanine supplement with your coffee

amelia41

New member
L-Theanine is an amino acid found in tea, but not in coffee. A lot of people report that taking an L-Theanine supplement with coffee helps calm and focus them, taking the edge off of the anxiety.

I recently got my significant other, who suffers from this problem, a supplement that includes L-Theanine, taurine, and GABA and it really seemed to help her.
 
@amelia41 good stuff, that. it also complements the taste of green tea nicely if you mix some theanine powder in.

i prefer to measure my own dosages with a scale, but if you're not into powders there are pills out there with balanced amounts of caffeine and theanine.
 
@amelia41 There's tea that has caffeine in it, some tea has more of a caffeine content than the coffee. Google should give you all of the answers. Matcha tea might work out for you. It has a good amount of caffeine but it doesn't make me anxious or jittery like espresso or drip coffee. I just came off of being a barista for a couple years.
 
@prodigalredeemed I know. This LPT is about L-Theanine, which is what prevents the caffeine in tea from causing the same type of jitterieness as coffee. My SO is quite aware of caffeine in teas, (she's kind of a connosour) and uses macha regularly. She also loves the flavor of coffee, and the way it goes well with things like chocolate, but if she has more than a little bit without taking L-Theanine alongside it she becomes cripplingly anxious.
 
@amelia41 Which studies? Can you just give me a link to the two studies themselves? That site has a myriad of links to sites owned by the supplement companies themselves. Can you link two independent placebo-controlled studies? I just couldn't find them there.
 
@vabredbabe These appear to be the most appropriate studies. I don't know how to go about finding the full text of them without academic credentials or paying money, and I do see that they don't include a huge number of subjects.

http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:284103
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1756464611000351
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21208586

All of them are double blind, though none of them examine coffee anxiety specifically.

Personally, I was mostly convinced more by the anecdotal evidence I saw from reviews on amazon listings, which seemed to describe a lot of people who used it for this specific effect and had seen a lot of improvement.

The effect for coffee
 

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